Two Computing Systems from over 5 years ago – Trip back down memory lane

Two Computing Systems from over 5 years ago Trip back down memory lane

I was showing my daughter what I used to use as a computer many years ago (showing my age) and she was amazed more astonished so I thought I would share with you all a brief trip down memory lane.

Commodore 64

First of all if you can remember the Commodore 64 (C64) a 1Mhz, 8 bit, 64k RAM (Commodore Computers, 1983) computer created by Metal Oxide Semiconductor Technology (MOS Technology) also known as Commodore Business Machines (Veit, 1999) should be listed as one of the most symbolic and state of the art personal computing systems of the 1980’s. The C64 was focussed to provide a great video game machining experience, outstanding performance and value for money compared to the other market players of the time.

· In January ‘1981 engineers decided to produce a state-of-the-art video and sound chip. The VIC-II 6567 video chip and the SID 6581 sound chip were created to be the most powerful chips of their time. The C64 equipped with these chips was able to display 16 colours and be reproduce a human voice without additional peripherals. (Matthews, 2010). Personally the game I enjoyed was a flight simulation called Ace of Aces (Personal Computer Museum, 2006) Ace of Aces very simple compared today’s 32bit graphics and millions of colours in say Flightgear (Flightgear Flight Simulator Project, 2010 – 2014)

· Initially called the VIC 30 the C64 design started 1981 and main production ran from 1982 through to 1989 (Matthews, 2010) (Bagnall, 2005) even today not many machines can say they have lasted that long in production the Apple iMac G3 lasted 1998-2001. (Edwards, 2008)

· The C64 made it into the Guinness Book of World Records in 2007. As of 2006 the C64 was the “Greatest selling single computer of all time”. Sources count units sold between 12 and 17 million (Peggy Mihelich – CNN, 2007).

· The C64 priced at $595 was less than half the price of the Apple II at $1395. (Commodore Computers Canada, 1983) and establish an estimated dollar value market share in the US of 43%. (Personal Computer Museum, n.d.)

· 20 Games That Defined the Commodore 64

Click for more on the references below or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_64

Apple iMac G3

Apple iMac G3 computing system should be badged as the system that ignited the drove colour into the personal computer industry and enable internet experience. What also made the iMac a focus was it marked the return of Steve Jobs as Chief Executive Officer (CEO) role.

· The iMac G3 design was led by Jonathan Ive (Arlidge, 2014) and Steve Jobs. Steve jobs launched and marketed the iMac in 1998 at Macworld (Channel, 2006). The marketing line most generally associated with the iMac G3 was it wasn’t another ‘beige box’. (Edwards, 2008) Still today you don’t see many beige box computers mainly grey black or coloured. (Lohr, 2002)

· The iMac G3 was launched 1998 and discontinued in 2003. The G3 name came from the PowerPC 750 G3 processor, and coupled with an ATI Rage graphics card creating excellent rendering performance. The newest generations have replaced the PowerPC chip in favour for Intel chip sets. (Simon, 2009)

· The main case colour was “bondi blue” but later thirteen colours became available. Today nearly all Apple Mac products are White, Silver no more bright colours but still no beige (Simon, 2009)

· Making iMac G3 more user-friendly, with attractive design translucent back and at the time of i for internet, built in browser and modem enabling internet access brought Apple in to the future, on this Steve Jobs interim CEO 1997 (Stone, 2011) started to rebuild the company. The built in speakers and internet access was personally a simple and easy to use experience.

Click for more on the references below or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IMac_G3

References locations you can find out more

 

Apple, 2013. Apple Reports Fourth Quarter Results. [Online]
Available at: http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2013/10/28Apple-Reports-Fourth-Quarter-Results.html
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

Arlidge, J., 2014. Jonathan Ive Designs Tomorrow. [Online]
Available at: http://time.com/jonathan-ive-apple-interview/
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Bagnall, B., 2005. On the Edge: the Spectacular Rise and Fall of Commodore. First ed. s.l.:Variant Press.

Channel, T. A. H., 2006. Steve Jobs introducing The First iMac 1998. [Sound Recording].

Commodore Computers Canada, 1983. Commodore Computers. [Online]
Available at: http://commodore.ca/gallery/adverts_commodore/computers_for_everybody_compute_aug83.jpg
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Commodore Computers, 1983. Commodore 64 Brochure (USA). [Online]
Available at: http://www.pcmuseum.ca/Brochures/C64BrochureUSA0283.pdf
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

Edwards, B., 2008. Eight Ways the IMac Changed Computing. [Online]
Available at: http://www.pcworld.com/article/149878/apple_imac.html
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Flightgear Flight Simulator Project, 2010 – 2014. FlightGear Flight Simulator Gallery V2.10. [Online]
Available at: http://www.flightgear.org/about/gallery-v2-10/
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Lohr, S., 2002. The Beige Box Fades to Black. [Online]
Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/18/technology/the-beige-box-fades-to-black.html
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Matthews, I., 2002. Commodore Innovations. [Online]
Available at: http://www.commodore.ca/history/company/commodore_firsts.htm
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

Matthews, I., 2010. Commodore 64 – The Best Selling Computer in History. [Online]
Available at: http://www.commodore.ca/commodore-products/commodore-64-the-best-selling-computer-in-history/
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Peggy Mihelich – CNN, 2007. CNN -. [Online]
Available at: http://edition.cnn.com/2007/TECH/ptech/12/07/c64/index.html
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

Personal Computer Museum, 2006. Personal Computer Museum – Software – Ace of Aces. [Online]
Available at: http://www.pcmuseum.ca/details.asp?id=37822&type=Software
[Accessed 17 04 2014].

Personal Computer Museum, n.d. World of Commodore. [Online]
Available at: http://www.pcmuseum.ca/3BCBE66B-3392-42DB-BAF5-4DBC97CD24A0/FinalDownload/DownloadId-F5A4246356AA43F57139BCF4A2F04C19/3BCBE66B-3392-42DB-BAF5-4DBC97CD24A0/Brochures/WOCProgram.pdf
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

Shaw, D., 2012. Commodore 64 turns 30: What do today’s kids make of it?. [Online]
Available at: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-19055707
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

Simon, M., 2009. The Complete iMac History — Bondi to Aluminum. [Online]
Available at: http://www.maclife.com/article/feature/complete_imac_history_bondi_aluminum
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Steil, M. & Biallas, S., 2011. How many Commodore 64 computers were really sold?. [Online]
Available at: http://www.pagetable.com/?p=547
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

Stone, B., 2011. Steve Jobs: The Return, 1997-2011. [Online]
Available at: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/the-return-19972011-10062011.html
[Accessed 08 04 2014].

Veit, S., 1999. PC – History COMMODORE 64. [Online]
Available at: http://www.pc-history.org/index.html
[Accessed 07 04 2014].

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