Microsoft Releases VDI ‘Starter Kit’ as Preview – Redmond Channel Partner

Microsoft Releases VDI ‘Starter Kit’ as Preview

Microsoft on Wednesday released a preview version of a new tool, dubbed Virtual Desktop Infrastructure Starter Kit 1.0,
which lets organizations test VDI scenarios using Remote Desktop Services (RDS) protocol.

The kit is only for testing purposes, and should not be used for production environments. The kit "complements" the
management console and wizards used with the RDS server role of Windows Server 2012 R2, according to Microsoft’s
announcement. It comes with a couple of applications, Calculator and WordPad, for testing virtual desktop access scenarios.

The final Starter Kit product is scheduled for release in the second quarter of this year. In the meantime, the preview can be
downloaded at this page.

The kit consists of PowerShell scripts that automate VDI deployments using Microsoft’s RDS protocol (formerly known as
"Terminal Services"). It deploys the Windows Server 2012 R2 RDS server-role components needed, including the connection broker,
session host, virtualization host and Web access components. It can be used with various virtual desktop "collections," including
personal, pooled or session-based ones.

Microsoft defines "a collection" as a group of servers that are managed together as part of a virtual machine (VM) deployment,
according to this TechNet Magazine article. The session-based collections are used for "desktop sessions and RemoteApps housed
on RD Session Host servers." The pooled and personal collections are used for "VM-based desktop sessions and RemoteApps
housed on VMs running Windows 7 or Windows 8."

Microsoft’s RemoteApps technology is a bit different in that the applications are accessed from a window on the end user’s local
machine, according to this TechNet library overview description.

The kit includes configuration settings for VDI deployments, which are contained in an XML file. Testers can modify the file to suit
their needs. For instance, it’s possible to alter the settings to expand from the default number of collections that are preconfigured
with the kit.

The lab environment needed to use the kit requires Windows Server 2012 R2 plus Windows 8.1 or Windows 7 clients, along with two
physical servers. There are some required initial setup steps, too, according Microsoft’s "Part 2" description of the kit. The kit comes
with a "readme" file that provides details about the architecture needed, as well as a deployment guide.

View more at source article…

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